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Cannabis Regeneration: Your Guide to Immortal Plants!

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Ever thought about regenerating your cannabis plants?

There is one continual problem with cannabis plants, and that is that they have one relatively short life cycle.

Once they have ‘done their stuff’ and rewarded your care an expertise with a bountiful crop of the sweetest buds, they then piss you off by dying.

All that hard work seemingly gone to waste, and a cruel blow if you have produced some of your best cannabis so far. But all need not be lost.

Even prior to trying regeneration, you can take cuttings from the mother plant just prior to flowering to preserve its phenotype – which is a fancy word for all its unique properties.

Ultimately, you can’t stop the plant from dying, but you can postpone the inevitable through regeneration or, more specifically, through re-vegging.

Re-vegging is also quicker than growing plants from seeds as you already have an established, mature root system.

The downside, albeit a minor one if you are not a commercial grower, is that the yield from re-vegging will be less, but the good news is that the properties of your next crop of cannabis will be identical to the previous one, and that of any clones you have produced.

In addition, you can still boost your yield with carful cannabis training, and we don’t mean getting it to sit and beg for water or nutrients, or to roll over wanting the underside of its leaves gently scratched!

We’ll be honest and say that re-vegging won’t always be successful and you are best to do as much reading on the subject as you can first.

To reveg your plant, you have to prune some of the buds before they flower, but leave the stems and buds on the bottom third of the plant.

Cover those new cuts to prevent disease.

Flush the roots with clean, lukewarm water.

Nurture the roots as though the plant was a seedling, using a nitrogen-rich food.
Re-pot the plant.

Restart the vegetative state by switching the lights on to a 24-hours-a-day cycle to trick it into thinking spring has arrived.

Once the plant has fully recovered, switch back to an 18-hour light phase.

You should then begin to see signs of regeneration within a couple of weeks and when ready for flower mode, switch the lighting phase to 12 hours on and 12 hours off.
Once your plant has flowered, she’ll be ready for harvesting again.

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